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Need a quick dip or a unique condiment? Wonderfully versatile, hummus is the best reason to keep a few extra cans of chickpeas and beans around. Try these tasty variations in your next sandwich or veggie wrap.

Recipe: Basil Pesto Hummus


Serving size: 2 oz.
Serving’s per recipe: 8
Prep time: 10 min
Cook time: 0 min


  • 1 can - Chickpeas, 16 oz. drained and rinsed
  • 2 Tbsp - Tahini, stirred well
  • 8-10 ea - Basil leaves, fresh
  • 1/2 ea - Lemon, juiced
  • 1 Tbsp - Parmesan cheese, grated
  • 1 clove - Garlic
  • 3 Tbsp - Extra virgin olive oil + more for garnish
  • Season to taste

Directions

Add all above ingredients to a food processor and pulse, scraping the sides as needed, until very smooth, about 4-6 minutes. Add more liquid, water or oil, to thin hummus as needed.

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Basil Pesto Hummus Nutrition Facts

Serving size: 2 Tablespoons

Calories 121
Carbohydrates 11g
Fiber 3g
Total Fat 7g
Saturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 4g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Protein 4g
Sodium 91mg
Sugar 2g

Recipe: Garlic Parmesan Hummus


Serving size: 2 oz.
Serving’s per recipe: 12
Prep time: 10 min
Cook time: 0 min


  • 1 can - Chickpeas, 16 oz. drained and rinsed (reserve 1/4 cup liquid)
  • 4 cloves - Roasted garlic
  • 1/4 cup - Extra virgin olive oil + more for garnish
  • 1/4 cup - Tahini, stirred well
  • 1/4 cup - Parmesan cheese, grated
  • 1/4 tsp - Cumin, ground
  • 2 Tbsp - Lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup - Reserved chickpea liquid or water
  • Season to taste

Directions

Add all above ingredients to a food processor and pulse, scraping the sides as needed, until very smooth, about 4-6 minutes. Add more liquid, water or oil, to thin hummus as needed.

Print recipe

Garlic Parmesan Hummus Nutrition Facts

Serving size: 2 Tablespoons

Calories 105
Carbohydrates 8g
Fiber 2g
Total Fat 8g
Saturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 4g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Protein 3g
Sodium 78mg
Sugar 0g

Recipe: White Bean Hummus


Serving size: 2 oz.
Serving’s per recipe: 8
Prep time: 10 min
Cook time: 0 min


  • 1 can - White northern beans, 15 oz. drained
  • 2 Tbsp - Lime, juice
  • 2 Tbsp - Sriracha, or more, to taste + for garnish
  • 2 cloves - Garlic
  • 2 Tbsp - Cilantro leaves, chopped
  • 1/8 tsp - Cumin, ground
  • 1/8 tsp - Paprika, smoked
  • 2 Tbsp - Extra virgin olive oil + more garnish
  • Season to taste

Directions

Add all above ingredients to a food processor and pulse, scraping the sides as needed, until very smooth, about 4-6 minutes. Add more liquid, water or oil, to thin hummus as needed.

Print recipe

White Bean Hummus Nutrition Facts

Serving size: 2 Tablespoons

Calories 89
Carbohydrates 12g
Fiber 3g
Total Fat 3g
Monounsaturated Fat 2g
Protein 4g
Sodium 136mg
Sugar 0g

Recipe: Veggie and Hummus Wrap

  • Collard greens (for outside of wrap)
  • Avocado
  • Tomato
  • Sprouts
  • Cabbage, purple
  • Cucumber
  • Hummus of choice

Directions

Start building your wrap by coating the collard green with your choice of hummus. Continue layering with your choice of toppings leaving 1-inch strip at the top of the collard leaf. Carefully roll the wrap and enjoy!

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Star Ingredient: Collard Greens

Collard Greens Contain:

Vitamin A*

When most people think of vitamin A, they think of their eyes. When vitamin A is lacking, the eye has difficulty adapting to changing light levels. Vitamin A is a versatile vitamin that also is involved with protein synthesis, reproduction and growth. The role that vitamin A plays in vision is undeniably important, but only one-thousandth of the body’s vitamin A is in the retina. Much more is in the skin and the linings of organs, where it participates in protein synthesis and cell differentiation.

Vitamin C*

Did you know the human body does not have the ability to produce vitamin C on its own? That’s why it’s so important to make sure we are eating a wide variety of foods with Vitamin C. This vital vitamin is not only useful to help our bodies fight off the common cold, but it’s necessary for the absorption of iron and very important for our connective tissues. Connective tissues are what keep our skin firm and our muscles strong. Because vitamin C supports our connective tissues, it is also useful in speeding up the healing process. If you have a wound, you might want to consider increasing the intake of foods higher in vitamin C.

Trivia: Cats and dogs can make vitamin C therefore they don’t need fruits and vegetables.

Vitamin K*

Vitamin K has long been known for its role in blood clotting. It also participates in the synthesis of several bone proteins. Bacteria in the intestinal track synthesize vitamin K that the body can absorb but people cannot depend on this source alone for vitamin K. Many foods contain ample amounts of vitamin K, notably green leafy vegetables and members of the cabbage family. If you are taking blood-thinning medication, be sure to talk with your Registered Dietitian or Physician about how much vitamin K is safe for you to consume.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.